Auction Ends: Feb 22, 2010 10:00 PM EST
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Art

HAN XIN Landscape Painting

Item Number
189
Estimated Value
$3,500
Sold
$2,000 to jonelain
Number of Bids
5  -  Bid History

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Item Description

Josephinum Landscape by renowned Chinese-born painter, Han Xin, who formerly lived in Columbus.

This is a beautiful gold framed gouache on paper measuring 26 x 24, and is signed by the artist.

Han Xin likes the thickness and richness of gouache, an opaque watercolor.  His brushwork is lush, quick, precise. Color-full, not loud.

No list of qualifications can determine the world’s most outstanding painter. But there is no more powerful and versatile practitioner of the brush than Xin.

The narrative of Xin’s career has been told and retold by dozens of reviewers. Born in the ancient city of Shanghai, Xin was taught by social realist and traditional masters. As a teenager he was considered one of the “Black” or suspect artists during the Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and ’70s. At that time, the Chinese government considered “modern” art, even Impressionism, dangerous.

Xin’s technique was enriched by teachers at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing, and clandestinely by Russian and “Western” artists who had been influenced by European artists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Han Xin once bicycled under cover of darkness to look at a Monet postcard!

With the alacrity of youth, Xin emigrated in 1981 to the United States, where he earned a Degree of Fine Arts in Painting from the California College of Arts and Crafts. In 1989, he won a Reader’s Digest Residency Award, which allowed him to live and work in Claude Monet’s studio in Giverny. Monet, that shimmer of light, remains an enormous influence.

Special Instructions

The photographs shown here do not do this painting justice!  If you would like an opportunity to see the painting in person, please contact Lucy Ackley at lackley@columbusschoolforgirls.org or 614-252-0781, ext. 136.

Donated By:

Fritz and Dorothy Sugar Ziegler, '55